Blog Archives

Cradoc primary school welcomes over 50 people seeking asylum/refuge

‘This was not a just a gesture but a practical demonstration of solidarity and love for those in need.’ Over 30 Cradoc School pupils came to school on Sunday 29th January to help Hay, Brecon and Talgarth Sanctuary for Refugees (HBTSR) to welcome 55 people seeking asylum or refuge in Swansea to Cradoc School for…

via Cradoc primary school welcomes over 50 people seeking asylum/ refuge — Hay, Brecon and Talgarth Sanctuary for Refugees

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60+ people complete our 7-part Food Safety Coaching course

food safety coaching menu

Please click Here or on the picture to view the lessons 🙂

We are very happy to say that over 60 people have attended and completed our Food Safety Coaching course at UiD.

We strive to meet the needs and exploit the interests of our community members when planning and delivering classes/training. This course was very popular as it is seen as being very useful for those who need to populate their CVs and ultimately find work in the future.

There will be a lot of people receiving certificates in the next few weeks. Well done to those who participated any many thanks indeed to our wonderful volunteers, without whom this would have been very difficult to manage given the high numbers of learners in the classes.

We provide the slideshows/materials freely for those who would like to review the course or have an interest.

Sharing Stories – Sharing Understanding. End of Project Celebration.

We are very proud of our participants at yesterday’s storytelling end of project celebration. Many thanks to Carl Gough from World of Connections, NIACE and Beyond The Border for providing these engaging and fun activities for us at UiD. We are very happy to have had so many people participating in the storytelling sessions and preparation lessons. Enormous respect for those that got up and told stories so well and importantly in a language other than their own. The outcomes have been fantastic with tangible evidence of improving English language skills and self-confidence. Something that has echoed throughout are the connections made between cultures and our collective love/need for stories. We have learnt so much about each other’s backgrounds, absolutely fantastic.

Many many thanks to all involved, especially the brave folks that got up and gave it their all at yesterday’s event. The feedback was excellent – we are very proud indeed.

Would you like a chip?

Another busy night at UiD with lots of friendly faces. As we are newly re-established we haven’t yet devised a strategy for providing a meal on Tuesday nights. We are nevertheless looking forward to food kindly cooked and brought along to the group by Govinda’s on Thursdays. Once again our volunteers came through and chips were on the table in no time. Did our members enjoy a traditional British meal? Yes of course they did. Are fish and chips actually British in origin? Well actually they aren’t.

Deep-fried fish was first introduced into Britain during the 16th century by Jewish refugees from Portugal and Spain, and is derived from pescado frito. In 1860, the first fish and chip shop was opened in London by Joseph Malin.

Chipshop Supper